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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
and thank for their service five departing members from the ohio delegation. congressman steve austria, dennis kucinich, steve latourette, gene schmidt, and betty sutton will end their service with us at the end of this year. and we'd like to go the next hour, as republicans and democrats, thank them for their service. i'd first like to recognize my colleague from central ohio, congressman steve stivers, for his remarks. mr. stivers: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to thank the gentleman for yielding. and i'd like to say a few things about our five departing colleagues who have given great service to our country. i want to thank them on behalf of the people of the 15th district for their incredible service and i'd like to talk a little bit about each one of them. i'll start with congressman steve latourette whose service in congress has really been incredible and he's been a role model for many of us who are younger. he's been a great mentor and he's not afraid to stand up for what he believes in. he knows that we've got to work together as republicans and democrats to solve our natio
congress. hear remarks from republican congressman jim jordan and steve scalise on the future of the conservative movement. they'll be speaking 3:30 eastern right here on c-span. >> belittle me. strangle me. >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us i think in this country, we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this if he none none that so many of us -- phenomenon that so many of us experienced one way or another and had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people will starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of growing up. this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. and director lee hersch and i started that film out of the feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up, coming up to the surface to say this isn't something that we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> filmmaker cynthia lowen gathered essayed and personal stories today i
of the united states, and i'm still cooking. [laughter] >> steve ford, linda johnson rob and jenna and barbara bush on growing up in the white house sunday evening at 7:30 eastern and pacific. it's part of four days of american history right through christmas day on c-span3. >> i think that the idea, and it was promoted in certain articles, and i think there was a conflation of politics because joel, who created the show, is a, is a, you know, a public conservative. i mean, the spectrum of political affiliations on the staff were, you know, from the far left to the far right. but it was no agenda, the idea that there was an agenda which was really the charge that was being forwarded, that we were somehow the midwife to policy on coercive interrogation was absurd, it is absurd. which isn't to say that if there wasn't an issue, if, in fact, our content was affecting the behavior of interrogators in the field, even if it was, you know, .05% of those interrogators actually were taking their cues from jack bauer, there was a systemic problem for sure that i suggested that we, you know, try to inter
. >> julie seger watches c-span on verizon. >> on the subject of the fiscal cliff, we spoke to steve forbes this morning and got his take on the subject. host: joining us now is the chairman and editor in chief of forbes media, steve forbes. he will be with us for the next 45 minutes to take your calls. let's start with where we started this morning on "washington journal." have you looked at the fiscal cliff and have you made plans or altered your 2013 spending as a business owner on this issue? guest: the answer is not yet. the big factor will be what happens in health care, which kicks in it in 2013 and 2014. you're kind of immobilize until we get a fix. we are moving ahead on the projects we are doing. people are being cautious. we hope this thing will be successfully resolved and that we do not go into a recession next year. host: how would you like to see this issue played out in washington? what is the best economic solution? guest: the best economic solution is to avoid raising taxes. the best we can hope for is that they kick the can down the road for a couple of months. you are no
the house after the adjournment of this congress. ohioans benefited from the service of steve latourette, who occupies the speaker's chair today, representatives dennis kucinich, betty sutton and steve augsrya. i want to thank steve latourette for his leadership and guidance in congress. i have had a privilege to working with my colleagues in support of our fellow buckeyes and americans. their service will not end with this congress. their innovative ideas and selfless service will be felt long after they leave the people's house. i look forward to their future roles as ohioans committed to advancing the interests of our communities, our state and our great country. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from california, the minority leader, ms. pelosi, for five minutes. ms. pells: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i -- ms. pelosi: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i'm glad that our speaker has brought the fiscal challenges to this floor. it's been long overdue. we have been calling on the
, steve. i would like to thank the secretary for his kind comments and i think it's important to note in addition to our united states senators, we are joined by the entire colorado delegation. our members of congress, diana degette, jared polis, cory gardner and congressman perlmutter. i had the great privilege to be with our former senator in the shadow of the rocky mountains where this tree once stood and we now have the high privilege of standing in the shadow of the capitol of the united states of america to be able to celebrate this season. when we went to carve that tree, we were joined there by members of the ute tribes. they are inherent to our area. the people of the ute tribes, they have a word that things are good -- to make sure that all is good. native american culture, it's about wind, about the sky, the land, and water. and from that, growth and life comes. this tree, which will represent the spirit of the state of colorado and indeed our nation speaks also to the importance as the secretary noted of forest health. in the state of colorado, we have many challenges this
and live in an america where they can come true. some of you share passion on this issue. steve scalise, a congressman from louisiana, recently elected as the leader of the republican study committee for the next congress. i yield to the gentleman from louisiana. mr. scalise: i thank the gentlelady for her leadership, not only for hosting this hour but for being so passionate about the need to control spending, and the need to get the economy back on track. she was talking about about solutions to avert the fiscal cliff. if if you look at how we got here, nothing gets resolved out of washington, it's an abyss that doesn't need to happen. if you just go back and look at the promises made by poth because massachusetts when he was running for office, when he was running for re-election, he talked about working across the aisle he talked about bipartisan solutions he talked about it a lot and the american people expected that the president would keep that promise. but before the ink was even dry, before some of the states had confirmed and finalized their vote totals for this last election,
on the ground since the incident doing everything they can to help us recover. we hosted an event with steve israel and we invited the businesses that were impacted and the horror stories that they shared with us were gut- wrenching. in addition to lives lost and homes lost, to hear the stories of those businesses ruined and destroyed as well, it was gut- wrenching. made available to the business communities, those resources to which it legally can, we think some changes are warranted. almost all the federal money available small businesses is in the form of loans. after this storm and in this economy, small business owners are resistant to taking on more debt. most of the money lost by small businesses can never be recovered. a homeowner might be eligible for a grant, but if you are a business owner, you're only federal auction is the loan. this has to change because those do not get back in the business fast by themselves unable to ever open again. small businesses often live week to week and have your reserves and are more dependent on daily cash flow. and i urge you to enhance the progra
and god only knows. host: let's go to phone calls. steve, democratic caller. welcome to the conversation. caller: thank you. chunk for -- thank you for c-span. my suggestion is two-fold. one, is that each owner of a gun or each gun rather should have a trigger lock where the lock actually prevents the trigger from being fired and it should be an expensive one not like the kind that's $20 where it doesn't work properly but a certified trigger lock. my second suggestion is that each owner of a gun every two or three years should meet with a psychiatrist or psychologist that would certify that this owner understands the importance of that trigger lock and has to, you know, understand that it should be on every time the owner is not using the gun. guest: having a psychiatrist or psychologist lecture on the importance of a trigger lock may not be the right area for their expertise. my brother was a deputy chief of police for many years, would probably say if someone should do that, it should be law enforcement who probably can send a, shall we say, more effective authority message than a psyc
such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, g growth stock of around 2% -- the conventional wisdom was that should -- that this president should not be reelected. as you take a look at what happened two weeks ago, how do you assess this? >> let me just say first that i made a very good living and politics betting agast conventional wisdom. it is a general principle of mine that the conventional wisdom is almost always wrong and it was wrong here. it was wrong here because what we often do in political circles and journalism is that we look at what happened in the last election or past elections and we think it is prescriptive for what
. up next is steve forbes. >> later, more members -- interviews with retiring members of congress. retiring nebraska senator bill nelson -- he served two terms and was part of the so-called gang of 14 to negotiate a compromise over judicial negotiations. 40 minutes later, interviews with two retiring house members. first, california republican jerry lewis, who chaired the appropriations committee. later, a conversation with california democrat lynn woolsey. >> i enjoy that it is straight forward. it is comprehensive. it has what is happening without a pundit interjecting. that is what i really appreciate about c-span. is a great resource for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works. >> julie watches c-span on bryson. c-span -- created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought you as a public service by your television provider. >> a look at the u.s. capitol here, where work continues in an effort to avoid the so-called fiscal clift of tax hikes and spending cuts that will take effect jan. 1. earlier, the house dabbled in for a pro forma session with no
negotiations as congress returns to washington. we are joined by steve forbes. later, a discussion on background checks, how they work, who gets them, and when they are required. our guest is matt denn it. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> i just enjoy that it is straight forward, comprehensive, and you can really sense what is happening without a pundit interjecting, and that is what i really appreciate about c-span. it is definitely a great resource for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now, state and defense department officials testified at a hearing on violence in the eastern congo. a rebel group of congolese army defectors has been terrorizing people. the congolese army, with the aid of u.n. peacekeepers, has been battling the defectors for the past eight months. this is an hour and 40 minutes. >> the situation in the democratic republic of congo continues to ev
that is already pending. with that, and want to turn it over to our good friend and colleague steve israel from new york. >> i have been in government and politics when you say my way or the highway, you usually end up on the highway. they need to turn around -- plan b may have failed. this time to get to plan c. that is compromise, comprehensive. we urge our republican colleagues to come back to washington, get to work on something that is a compromise, a basis of what should be the president's compromise. every time we've offered a compromise, the republicans have gone in the other direction. when we were here, they were there. when we were in this direction, they left town. that is no way to get the compromise that is comprehensive. we urge them to return to work, returned to washington and avoid this fiscal cliff. but that, and turn it back to our leader. >> thank you. i was interested the speaker said last night the house did not take up the bill. that it was the will of the house. it was not the will of the house. you don't know with the will of the house is until you bring a bill to the
. and i hope that beginning now when people hear fair share, they'll think abouter a flat tax. steve forbes has been talking about it for years. rand paul had an article out a year or so ago, flat tax. my friend, mike burgess, has a proposal. many of us have proposals. mine is, look, you talk about want warren buffett to pay what his secretary does, yet you haven't made one proposal that will bring warren buffett to pay what his secretary does. that's crazy. that's why we shouldn't eliminate the word lunatic. it really has application around this town. so if you want to have -- and warren buffett ought to take heed, you run around telling people, yeah, rich people should pay more taxes, well, he's not. he's not going to pay more. not on any of the proposals that the president has run around endorsing. well, how about a flat tax that says 15% capital gains tax, what warren buffett pay, 15% for his secretary, 15% gift tax. let's just go 15% across the board. 15% corporate tax. and the irony is that the economy would so explode, so many more people would be employed, so many more people
of chicago economist steve davis and co-authors, where they have this cool new index. it is a very innovative paper. they estimated that debt limit struggle subtracted about 1.5% from g.d.p. growth during that summer when it was happening because of the uncertainty and the inactivity caused by high levels of uncertainty. eve time we go through there, we bear a negative short-run cost. but if that is what it takes to get spending under control, then we have to concede that in the long run there is a benefit that we don't have these massive deficits crowding out long-term growth. the struggle would depending on whether debt reduction buys space for private capital or not. we may have higher economic growth in the long-run because we went through that struggle. >> so your position is we should be ready to go through that struggle again and in fact default on the national debt if necessary in order to enforce spending limits? >> that is of course not my position. my position is we should never default on the national debt. the politics of debt reduction as you all know better than me are very, ve
then you had, for instance, republicans like steve latourette talking about a majority of republicans, is what he told us today, would be open to discussing gun control. did the president feel like he was behind all that? >> i think you're trying to turn this into like a political theater thing. that's not how the president views it. he wept to newtown in his role as president and met with family members of victims. he met with first responders and with others in that community and then he spoke to that community and tried to convey the grief and the pain that the american people are feeling and share with those who are suffering. so deeply in connecticut. and at that time he spoke about the fact that we cannot tolerate these kinds of tragedies and that we have to act and it would be unfor giveble not to try to -- unforgettable to not to try to take steps that try to address the problem, that address our fundamental responsibility to take care of our children in the first instance. and he is, as he said, and true to his word, moving forward on that process. the conversation he had, th
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)